Stephanie Caspelich

Reporting the news that matters.

Posts Tagged ‘refugee

An Alliance to Help the Refugee Community of Chicago

leave a comment »

Students, supporters, volunteers and refugee families gathered in West Rogers Park on a cold spring day to support the fundraising efforts of a mutual aid agency that has provided outreach and development services since 2002.

Pan-African Association was established to assist refugees and immigrants of African descent with their resettlement needs, especially once the 90-day federal assistance from agencies like Refugee One run out,” said Malik Kemokai, volunteer coordinator and event organizer for Power to Empower. “We have since extended our services to refugees from Iraq and Burma through community-building and life-enriching programs. We have also worked together with the Bhutanese Community Association of Illinois on securing funding from the Department of Health and Human Services-Office of Refugee Resettlement, which they started receiving in 2010.”

For the volunteers and employees of the Pan-African Association, a mutual aid agency located at 6163 N. Broadway Ave., the challenges have inspired them to call on their community’s support through the Power to Empower event held Saturday, April 21, at Warren Park.

In 2011, PAA served the needs of over 1200 individual clients. The need is great but funding from federal agencies like HHS and state agencies like the Illinois Department of Human Services has not been enough to support the refugee community. PAA has relied heavily on its 110 volunteers to teach English as a Second Language, assist in work and computer vocational training, mentoring and citizenship and civic education programs, according to Kemokai.

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

The Lost Boys of Sudan: A Story of Survival, Resettlement and the Ongoing Struggle to Promote Peace in South Sudan

leave a comment »

The voices of South Sudan filled the halls of St. Paul’s Church by-the-Lake.

It was Sunday and a small group of refugees from South Sudan gathered at the Episcopal Church in Rogers Park, one of the most culturally and economically diverse neighborhoods on the far north side of Chicago. Most of the parishioners are male between the ages of 30 and 35. They have come to sing hymns and read the gospel of the week in Dinka, the dialect of South Sudan’s major ethnic group.

“The church has been our place of refuge since most of us arrived in Chicago in 2001,” said The Rev. Awan Abraham, 33, a deacon from South Sudan. “We use to have our community gatherings in the rectory on Thursday evenings, but the volunteers stopped coming in 2007. We have since transitioned to this more prayerful format.”

The Lost Boys of Sudan is a term given by aid workers in refugee camps to more than 20,000 young boys who were displaced during Sudan’s second civil war from 1983 to 2005. The children were caught in the middle of the conflict between the Islamic central Sudanese government led by Prime Minister Sadiq Al-Mahdi and the Sudan People’s Liberation Army  led by rebel leader John Garang.

Read the rest of this entry »

Kukulu Market: A Slice of Ethiopian Life in Chicago

leave a comment »

Kukulu Market has been serving a wide array of spices, Ethiopian coffee and its famous injera to Chicago’s diverse Edgewater community since it opened its doors in 2003.

“Edgewater has the biggest Ethiopian community in Chicago,” said owner Assefa Retta, who moved to Chicago from Addis Ababa (Ethiopia’s capital) in 2000. “There are a couple of communities scattered as far north as Howard Street and as far west as Western Avenue.”

Throughout the 1970s to 1990s, Ethiopians suffered from the crippling effects of military conflict and full-scale war with Eritrea and Sudan. As a result, about 37,000 Ethiopians sought asylum in the United States as refugees.

According to the U.S. Census, 4,500 Ethiopians resided in Chicago in 2000.

Though integration into American society posed its own set of challenges, Ethiopian immigrants remained steadfast in their search for a better life with the support of community organizations like the Ethiopian Community Association of Chicago, religious congregations like the Ethiopian Orthodox Church and one-stop shops like Kukulu Market, which is Amharic (Ethiopia’s official language) for rooster’s crow.

Aside from well-stocked shelves that carry everything from berbere, teff, lentils, Yirgacheffe coffee, niter kibbeh to traditional coffee dresses, movies, music cds and books, Kukulu Market also carries a locally produced monthly magazine written in Amharic that gives homesick folk a rundown of recent events in Ethiopia.

“The magazine was started because of our nostalgia for life in Ethiopia,” said Retta. “Essentially, the title of the publication translates to ‘Remembrance’.”

And while the shop has loyal following among members of the local Ethiopian community, it has attracted other East African immigrants spread across Chicago (the Sudanese are big fans of injera) and food lovers from New York.

This humble shop at 6129 N. Broadway St. has proven that food can bring a community together and, occasionally, provide a cure for the homesick blues.

Written by Stephanie Caspelich

February 28, 2012 at 4:05 am

GC

Filmmaker. Day Dreamer. Video Gamer. Cheeseburger & Junk Food Enthusiast.

The wannabe travel ninja

“We travel, some of us forever, to seek other states, other lives, other souls.” Anais Nin

delaney duvall

foto fatal

Lauren Timmerman

Lauren Timmerman

Aventura

En Lima y Cuzco

Synopsis

Writings on Seldom Travels, Arbitrary Opinions & Notions

Curious Miss Cole

a travel and lifestyle blog

Selfies Abroad

My Face (In Peru)

Sylvia Obén

Reporter/Journalist

Rose on toes

Times of travel

Reporting from Ireland

Discovering Ireland one news story at a time.

Stephanie Caspelich

Reporting the news that matters.

natethayer

A compilation of current reporting and archived published work of journalist Nate Thayer